close
close

Colorado’s AI laws further complicate the compliance equation

Given IT’s heavy dependence on vendors and third parties, many company executives and even CIOs may not be aware of all the ways AI can help – which often takes place via clouds, SaaS applications, third parties, remote locations, mobile devices and the office home – influencing their customers. These hidden AI activities, which Computerworld has dubbed insidious AI, could potentially be enforced under laws like this.

Brian Levine, a managing partner at Ernst & Young who is also a lawyer, has reviewed the bill and does not expect that third-party ignorance of the use of artificial intelligence will be a serious problem.

“If you know that the product you are using has artificial intelligence in it,” it means it requires action, he said. “But if you don’t know and you don’t deliberately stick your head in the sand, then in my opinion this bill does not impose any obligations on her. The knowledge of what a third party is doing is not necessarily attributable to you,” he said, adding that the bill does not contain a reference to strict liability.